• @quinkin@lemmy.world
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    466 months ago

    For those like me wondering what it is:

    Geany is a small and lightweight Integrated Development Environment. It was developed to provide a small and fast IDE, which has only a few dependencies from other packages. Another goal was to be as independent as possible from a special Desktop Environment like KDE or GNOME - Geany only requires the GTK3 runtime libraries.

    • @MisterD@lemmy.ca
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      176 months ago

      Finally!

      Even their own website won’t tell you.

      Lots of people are TRYING to leave windows and go to Linux. Please keep posting these informative descriptions.

        • @ShittyBeatlesFCPres@lemmy.world
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          26 months ago

          It’s a text editor for development, basically. The goal is to make it light and independent of all the Linux desktop environments (so it can be included with any distro). So, if you’re putting together a lightweight, minimalist setup using LXCE or XFCE, you could install Geany without a bunch of Gnome or KDE libraries being installed as dependencies.

          A use case might be to install it on Raspian (for a Raspberry Pi). It’d be a step up from just using a plain text editor without requiring much more in the way of resources.

  • Possibly linux
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    176 months ago

    I want to like geany. However, its just not customizable and it lacks support for a lot of things.

    • Ramin Honary
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      116 months ago

      I want to like geany. However, its just not customizable and it lacks support for a lot of things.

      I would say it is customizable, but I think it is relatively difficult to customize compared to a lot of other editors (e.g. Emacs). I think Geany is a nice, free/libre alternative to VSCode, and about as difficult to customize as VSCode, but does not have quite as many extensions available for it due to the fact that unlike VSCode, Geany is not supported by a multi-billion dollar company with the goal of embracing, extending, and extinguishing all other competing editors.

      Geany Extensions are written in C which is not a scripting language and so unlike in Emacs you can’t just write a quick 2 or 3 line script like you would in Emacs to solve some unique text-editing problem.

      Geany does have extensions for Python and Lua scripting, but there is almost no ecosystem of Lua or Python scripts, and trying to access the editor features from Lua or Python requires deep knowledge of the Geany Gtk3 API. Compare this to something like the “Lite” text editor which has the whole user interface written in Lua, and therefore you can write fairly elaborate text editing scripts and user interfaces entirely in Lua. You just cannot do this with Geany.

      • @flashgnash@lemm.ee
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        46 months ago

        In what world is Vscode not customizable? I guess the overall UI structure is fairly static but you can move bits left to right, hide and show stuff, colour themes, set your own shortcuts etc

        • Ramin Honary
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          6 months ago

          “In what world is Vscode not customizable?”

          When I think of “easy to customize,” I am thinking about Emacs in particular, but really any editor that includes a scripting engine which is used to program the entire editor user interface.

          With editors like VSCode or Geany that I would say are “hard to customize,” you can’t just write a snippet of TypeScript or C++ into a file which you can just run right there in the editor process. You can write extensions in TypeScript, but they have to be properly compiled, linked against the editor libraries, and properly installed with a manifest and everything, in order to write your own code that runs in a way that modifies the editor’s behavior. That or you have to run your TypeScript code as a text filter in an external Node.js process.

          Geany does have Lua and Python scripting engines as extensions, but you have to understand the Geany API pretty well in order to do anything elaborate, it was never really designed for people to be able to script the entire GUI or define their own whole unique workflows.

          With Emacs, or any scriptable text editor, you just write a few lines of code and run it (even without saving a file), and the code actually alters the state of the editor itself. While you could write an entire app, like a Matrix or Mastodon client, as you would like a VSCode or Geany extension, you can also easily write a few lines of code to do any random thing at all. You can write code to suit any workflow imaginable, no matter how ridiculous: code that changes the color theme of the whole editor at certain times of the day, or code that opens certain kinds of files always in 3 separate windows, each window scrolled to a particular section of the file. You can run processes or alter the filesystem or transform entire batches of files in response to any event.

          And you can do all of this without compiling or installing extensions of any kind, and often with no more than a dozen lines of code. There are no limitations. This is what I consider to be “easily customizable.”

        • @seitanic@lemmy.sdf.org
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          6 months ago

          Geany would need to have support for VSX. That could happen, but I’m sure that it wouldn’t be a small project.

    • @ganymede@lemmy.ml
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      6 months ago

      not customizable

      themes, plugins, ridiculously easy custom configurations/build commands etc you can even control the window manager from config files if you want to, its insanely customisable

      lacks support for a lot of things

      edit: trying to sound less snarky, but do you have a lot of examples?

      i could see these criticisms arising from a quick glance. or we may have slightly different definitions of these terms. which is fair enough.

      imo geany’s ratio of features to weight is remarkable, perhaps singularly so?

      • daddyjones
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        26 months ago

        Based on about 20 minutes of searching last night - it seems to lack support for debugging outside of gdb.

        That’s quite a major thing to not have if you’re going to claim support for lots of languages…

        • @ganymede@lemmy.ml
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          6 months ago

          true, though its fairly easy to use the build interface to setup basic debugging support (breakpoints, watches etc) for unsupported languages. but i admit, its not the same.

          you’re right, that’s a fair criticism

      • Possibly linux
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        26 months ago

        I just know I wasn’t able to get code suggestions, highlighting or error highlighting working. There might be a way but I spend a bunch of time on it and accomplished nothing. If there is a way it isn’t obvious

        • @ganymede@lemmy.ml
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          16 months ago

          suggestions should work by default, if by which you mean basic completion of names etc

          anyway fair enough, its not for everyone.

          sorry for being a bit overly defensive, i just really love geany lol

      • Nom Nom Nom
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        76 months ago

        Kate is fine if you are already running KDE. If you are using a different wm, you need to install half of KDE to use it.

  • Aatube
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    6 months ago

    Wow. 18 years of development yet it has a smaller version number than most versioned distros. Finally someone doing semantic versioning!

  • Christian
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    46 months ago

    I use geany for coding in LaTeX, and occasionally teaching myself some programming stuff when I have free time. I’m aware it’s not a great choice for experienced programmers, but I don’t really need something feature-rich and extensive, so I appreciate the simplicity.

    • Luis Norambuena
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      26 months ago

      I use VSCode for coding, but if it’s a small script or pure text files, then I use Geany.

  • @neoA
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    46 months ago

    Nice!

  • samsy
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    46 months ago

    What a nice milestone. Congrats to the devs. I tried a lot of IDEs but geany is just simple and perfect.