• @RoyaltyInTraining@lemmy.world
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    175 months ago

    I used to think open source applications were simply the inferior alternative that you choose when you don’t have the money for the real thing, but then I started to notice how Blender suddenly looked almost equivalent to the industry standard apps when update 2.8 came out. That made me question my previous position. Fast forward a few years, I now proudly use Linux and FOSS applications whenever I can.

    • @rufus@discuss.tchncs.de
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      5 months ago

      I see this attitude from time to time. At some point a friend asked about a cheaper alternative to Adobe to cut some videos. And I suggested Kdenlive and another alternative (maybe OpenShot) and OBS to record the screen. Yet they chose to use some free version of a gamer screen recorder and I don’t know which Videoeditor that just cost $15 or $25. And the result was an ugly watermark from the screenrecorder and cuts and text that looked worse than what I did with Windows Movie Maker in 2003. I’m still puzzled.

  • Daeraxa
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    155 months ago

    Entirely accidental. I’m not a developer and at most I had dabbled with a Linux in the past but nothing beyond a couple of VirtualBox VMs, I just didn’t see or have a need for it.

    Around late 2020 the note taking app Evernote changed a bunch of stuff. I had been using Evernote for years and suddenly they updated to a new feature-poor app and placed a bunch of restrictions on the free accounts. That prompted me to look at “free” (free as in money, not as in freedom) alternatives. I stumbled upon Joplin and really liked it. I noticed a few things I thought could be improved as well as a few bugs so I joined and started hanging around on the forums. At some point I realised I could probably fix one of these small issues myself (without any programming knowledge beyond some SQL) and, with some help and encouragement from some of the maintainers, was able to build the app from source, fix the issue and create a PR. I then got more involved with the community and started to improve the documentation.

    That is when the open source bug bit me. I installed Linux as it just seemed (and was) easier than doing this kind of thing on Windows. I was invited to the Joplin team, got involved with Google Summer of Code as a mentor for Joplin and otherwise really got into it.

    Then it all stepped up massively last year when GitHub announced they were killing off the Atom text editor. Whilst looking for alternatives I got involved with atom-community which then split off to create a fork of Atom, Pulsar which was a mad rush to get everything together. Not only save what we could of Atom (the package repository wasn’t open source) but also to keep momentum going and make sure that those people using Atom still had somewhere to go and try to gather some sort of community whilst it was still somewhat relevant.

    And yeah, otherwise now almost exclusively use open source stuff and try to get involved with the communities of other open source projects.

    • Ms. ArmoredThirteen
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      35 months ago

      Wait Atom has a successor? I did the perfectly normal thing when I saw the sunsetting popup and stuck my head in the sand to gleefully wait for the day it suddenly stops working. I’ll have to check out Pulsar

      • Daeraxa
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        25 months ago

        Yup, we even had a new release the other day. It will still be familiar to you as very little has otwardly changed, most of the updates have been behind the scenes - electron upgrades, a modern tree sitter implementation etc. We also have working package management thanks to a from scratch implementation of a new package backend. The blog section on the website has most of the backstory and is regularly updated.

  • @whereisdani_r@lemmy.world
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    145 months ago

    Reddit protests so I migrated to try kbin, lemmy, mastodon. Learned about fediverse, activitypub - than down rabbit hole to open source communities, then open source software…moved to linux and it’s a whole new world!

  • @MrFunnyMoustache@lemmy.ml
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    135 months ago

    I wasn’t satisfied with Windows Vista, but didn’t want to be forever stuck with XP, wasn’t going to buy a Mac because I didn’t want to spend a lot of money when I had a reasonable computer already… Found out about Linux and tried it. Funnily enough, I had used it for almost a year without actually knowing what open source meant, or what source is… I just saw it as “Ubuntu is free and isn’t Windows”.

      • @MrFunnyMoustache@lemmy.ml
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        55 months ago

        Like I said, at the time I didn’t even know what open source meant and assumed that Linux is a product, and Ubuntu was the company that made it. I know better now, but back then I just saw it as a “replace Windows without spending money”. Also I was a teenager, and I would have pirated anything back then without a second thought even if it weren’t free.

        Also, since Linux is so widely used by corporations, they fund its development, so I prefer to donate the small amounts of money I can to smaller projects.

        • @Pantherina@feddit.de
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          -25 months ago

          Linux ≠ Linux Desktop

          This is a huge problem in the community and the decentralized nature. Like, I dont even know what projects I all use, like curl, ffmpeg, bubblewrap, flatpak, systemd, all these things and again, these are well known projects.

          This is a huge funding problem as only GUI apps can ask for funding. Corporations often dont fund small projects, but often just the kernel and Core apps.

          Not shaming teenage you of course :D

          • @MrFunnyMoustache@lemmy.ml
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            15 months ago

            Linux ≠ Linux Desktop

            I’m aware, I was just explaining my experience back in 2007. It was like moving to a new country where things work differently and the attitude needed was very different from what I am used to.

  • @SteelCorrelation@lemmy.one
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    115 months ago

    Great. I was tired of shitty stuff and fell into the rabbit hole. Here I am some two decades later and I love it. I contribute back by writing documentation since I lack coding skills, but I’m a technical writer for a living, so why not give back some of those writing skills?

  • ultratiem
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    5 months ago

    Installed Linux first year of Uni. Made themes and graphics for KDE (they even rolled some upstream). Then moved to GNOME and made lots of GTK themes and OS assets. Still have my name on GIMP’s list of contributors.

    The cool thing about open source is you can just jump right in.

    • whoareu
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      25 months ago

      Same here! If my father bought me a high end PC I would never go down into Linux and FOSS rabit hole.

  • kreynen
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    75 months ago

    @shapis Almost 20 years ago, I followed Lawrence Lessig’s RSS feed. He made a request for software that could be used to advance slides on a remote computer. I knew AppleScript fairly well and thought, “how hard can that be?”. I wrote a one script that would “listen” for the text “Next Slide” in iChat and then try to advance whatever was open in PowerPoint. I wrote another script with a basic UI so the presenter could easily “type” Next Slide while presenting. It was basic, but it worked. I think I shared the code with an MIT license. Even though the code was free and Dr. Lessig already agreed to meet with a class about IP Law at the university I was working for at the time, he also contributed $50 to my project. He could have just downloaded the scipts and used them without paying anything, but that simple act changed my life. I realized that some people who could afford it would pay for code I even when I was giving away. Most people don’t, but enough do that I’ve been able to continue contributing my code, helping to fix bugs in other people’s code and sponsoring other projects today.

    https://archives.lessig.org/indexb00c.html?p=2897

  • Stefano Marinelli
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    65 months ago

    In 1996, with Linux. From 1998, I stopped using Windows. In 2002, I met the BSDs. After all these years, I am even more convinced that the only way to preserve data conservation, accessibility, and freedom is to manage and store them through open tools and protocols.

  • @harald_im_netz@feddit.de
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    45 months ago

    How: Bumpy. Now I found a way to participate by translating and writing documentary, as most projects are lacking proper.

    What: My interest in pursuing a more data-private life.

  • angelsomething
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    5 months ago

    It was back in the early 2000s. There was a monthly magazine on Linux and my first issue included the complete install for suse Linux. I was hooked. It’s been a journey since.

    • @rufus@discuss.tchncs.de
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      5 months ago

      Same here. Some nice german computer magazine with an (old) version of Suse, then Ubuntu. I broke the shared family computer more than once until I figured out the partitioning, bootloader and many driver issues. But it was just pirated games on the harddisk back then, so the one time I wiped the entire disk, I just went to the next LAN party and copied everything from my friends again. Linux really resonated with me. And I was still young so I was curious, impressed by what people do and it was easy to take everything in and learn the concepts. I stuck with Linux since. But I suppose it’s more difficult if you switch to Linux as an adult. You got stuff to do, want that PC to work and don’t have as much time to spend.

  • @neoA
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    35 months ago

    Very rough. I tried ubuntu 16.04 LTS I believe and almost didn’t come back. I had no idea what the hell I was doing, and I couldn’t play most of my games (which was the most important to me at the time). I don’t even remember why I decided to try ubuntu over reinstalling windows at the time.

    Thankfully my second go @ Linux Mint 18.3 was much more usable, or I wouldn’t be here today.